Postdoctoral Research Associates

The Zamudio lab in the Department of Molecular Cellular and Developmental Biology and the Broad Stem Cell Research Center at UCLA is seeking career-driven and creative Postdoctoral Research Associates to join our multidisciplinary team. We are studying new mechanisms of gene regulation by functional noncoding RNAs using a combination of genomic, system biology, biochemistry and cell biology approaches. Laboratory research will involve a variety of cutting-edge approaches in RNA and stem cell biology providing an ‪excellent research training opportunity in genomics, bioinformatics and translational science. ‬

Ph.D. in Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, Genetics/Genomics, Bioinformatics, Chemistry or a related field is required. ‪Experience and publication record in statistical genomics, computational biology, stem cell biology or related fields‬ including analysis of CLIP, ChIP, WGBS and RNA-seq data is preferred, but not required. ‪Applicants with strong background in RNA molecular biology, genetics or related fields who are interested in developing new genomic approaches in mouse cancer models are also encouraged to apply. ‬Competitive candidates will have a record of scientific productivity, leadership and collaborations.‬‬

Start Date: ASAP

Applicants should submit the following to jesse.zamudio@nullucla.edu:
1) Cover letter stating: laboratory experience in RNA biology and bioinformatics; your long-term career goals; date of availability to begin postdoc research
2) Curriculum vitae (including publications and awards/honors)
3) List of at least three references

Jesse Zamudio was trained in the laboratory of Dr. Phil Sharp at the MIT Cancer Center. At MIT, he characterized regulation by the RNAi pathway in mammalian cells. Using system biology approaches, he found new species of RNA bound to Argonaute in a Dicer-dependent and Dicer-independent manner. The Zamudio lab’s research goal is to characterize new mechanisms of RNA-mediated regulation essential for development and involved in disease progression.